Lunar Parallax Demonstration Project

LPDP - Parallax Results: Contributors...

Observers were requested to take one photograph at 01h20m UT on the 9th of November that showed the Moon as a disk and at least two stars. To be honest, I wasn't sure what would come back from this request as I deliberately kept the request for images vague so as not to frighten off potential contributors.

Most images that came back were narrow field (close ups of the Moon and immediate star field). A couple of wide field shots (small Moon and lots of stars) were submitted providing ample opportunity for presenting the final results. A massive thanks must go to those that contributed (whether I used your images or not!). Projects like this cannot succeed unless individuals are prepared to let someone use their hard earned images for a common purpose. From a personal perspective, this project has demonstrated to me something that I've known to exist but have never 'seen' before. If nothing else I thank those that contributed for giving me that opportunity.

The internet also shows that observers are no longer lost souls in the night. As contributor Paul Hyndman put it, due to the internet we are now united lost souls of the night.

Personal thanks go to the following contributors...

I think I've listed everybody there (if not please email me and let me know!)

A number of these contributors also worked with me on the "Planets In Motion" project (2002).

LPDP Results:

Click on a link to view the results...

1) Narrow Field, Local Parallax (Europe)
Shows the small parallax effect of moving observing position over relatively
small distances (in the order of hundreds of km).


2) Narrow Field, Inter-continental Parallax (USA-Europe)
Shows the large parallax effect of moving observing position over relatively
large distances (in the order of thousands of km).


3) Wide Field, Inter-continental Parallax (USA-Europe)
Shows the large parallax effect of moving observing position over relatively
large distances. The view here shows the Moon roughly as it would appear
to a visual observer with no optical equipment.


4) Different views of the Moon's disk from widely separated observers
Shows the difference in the appearance of the Moon when viewed from
widely separated locations (separated by thousands of km).
The images of the Moon used in this result were taken at the same time.


5) Different views of the Moon's disk over time
Shows the difference in the appearance of the Moon when viewed from
the same location at different times on the same night.


6) Lunar 3D stereo image - UPDATED
Three different 3D views of the Moon using contributor's images.

7) Calculating lunar distance
Accurate capture of parallax images provides us with an opportunity
to calculate the distance to the Moon. Are you up to the challenge?


7a) Calculated results - NEW
November 9th 2003 - the first distance estimate is in!


8) How the parallax animations were put together
How the parallax images were constructed from the original contributor's
images.


9) Gallery of contributor's images
Here are the original images (reduced in size) that contributors kindly
donated for this project.


[All images are copyright their respective owners.]


Many of the results rely on animated GIF files being shown animated. Sometimes this doesn't work. If the graphic below is static (i.e. not animated) then it is possible that your browser is not going to show the results animations properly. After encountering this problem myself, the advice that actually seemed to fix the problem was provided by the following site http://www.sniggins.com/animation_problems.htm.




  Home   Email   LPDP   Results